Important Statistics on Childhood Hunger in the U.S.

In 2000, 13 million children lived in households that did not have an adequate supply of food, and almost 3 million of these children lived in households that experienced hunger.
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, March 2002 "Household Food Security in the United States, 2000"

Between 2000 and 2001, requests for emergency food assistance increased by an average of 23% in American cities, with 54% of requests coming from families with children.
— U.S. Conference of Mayors, December 2001, "A Status Report on Hunger and Homelessness in American Cities, 2001"

More than 23 million low-income people received emergency food assistance through the America's Second Harvest Food Network in 2001, including 9 million children (39% of all recipients and 1 in 10 children in America.
America's Second Harvest, November 2001, "Hunger in America, 2001"

33 million Americans continue to live in households that did not have an adequate supply of food. Nearly one-third of these households contain adults or children who went hungry at some point in 2000.
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, March 2002, "Household Food Security in the United States, 2000"

Recent research indicates that even mild under-nutrition experienced by young children during critical periods of growth may lead to reductions in physical growth and impaired brain function.
Center on Hunger and Poverty, Brandeis University, 1998, "The Link Between Nutritoin and Cognitive Development in Children"